Staying Within Your Wedding Day Budget

Paying for your wedding can be one of the most stressful parts of the planning process. You have a budget, but how can you stick to it? Almost always, people tend to spend more than their budget accounts for. Here are five things to consider to help you stay within your means.

1) Budget Accurately: When coming up with your budget, you might include obvious wedding day needs like the reception site and flowers, but what about the hidden costs? Some costs are often overlooked. Things like stamps for your invitations, tips for vendors, or gifts for bridesmaids aren't factored into the overall budget and can end up leaving you short before the big day arrives. When creating your budget, try to include all of these little aspects of planning and then add some extra bucks as a cushion in case there is something you missed. 

2) Be Flexible: If you're trying to cut costs and trim your budget, you'll have to be flexible while planning your wedding. You may have to opt for a DJ over a live band or scrap wedding favors for the guests. Look at your overall budget and decide what's most important to you and start cutting costs based on your observations. Being flexible also means shopping around for cost effective alternatives. That might mean a social hall instead of a luxury hotel, opting for candles instead of costly flower for centerpieces, or seeking out vendors in less expensive neighborhoods, .

3) Stick to Your Guest Count: One of the most effective ways to cut costs is to limit your guest count. Once you and your groom have decided on a number, stick with it. The more people you add to your list, the more you're going to pay. By limiting plus ones or even children, in some cases, you can help yourself stay within budget too. Remember this point when a friend asks if she can bring a date. While it would be nice if you could invite him, it's important to let guests know that you're on a budget and can't accommodate everyone.

4) Don't Splurge: It's easy to want to splurge for your wedding. You see something beautiful and you must have it for the big day. Unless you can afford it or factored it into your overall budget, don't do it, or at least, limit it to a single splurge. But remember you'll have to tweak the rest of your budget to make up for it. 

5) Keep Your Wedding Finances Up to Date: To ensure you're staying within your means, make sure to keep your wedding finances separate and updated. Use a spreadsheet or other way to make it easy to see what you're spending on and how much money you have left. Keep all your receipts and review your budget regularly to make sure everything is in financial order and on track. The more you keep yourself apprised of your financial status, the more likely you'll stay within your means.

Photo by Hayes & Fisk Photography at www.hayesandfisk.com or on Facebook and Twitter @HayesandFisk

 

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

Monday Motivation

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Posted on July 28, 2014 .

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

It's Always Happily Ever After, Right?

You love your husband, being married, and sharing your life together. It feels like a fairy tale, until one day you're ready to scream! Maybe it's something he said or did or didn't say or didn't do, but you've had it. It was supposed to always be happily ever after, wasn't it?

Join the hopeless romantic club. Yes, it is happily ever after or more aptly "almost" always happily ever after. Life is full of ups and downs and to think marriage is otherwise is misleading. Everybody make mistakes. You respond too quickly, forget to listen, or ignore feelings. To sum it up you're human. And when your spouse blunders, you're bound to get upset.

The very first thing you need to do when you start to get angry at something he did or said is to take a break. Better than fly off the handle, get out and get some air. This is probably the hardest step, since it's human nature to react if triggered. But it's also the most effective way to help you calm down and get your feelings in check. It's always best to approach an uncomfortable situation with a level head. You can rant and rave alone in the car, if you must, to get it off your chest. But somehow find a way to get your emotions together before you talk it out with your spouse.

Once you feel in control and have a good idea of how to communicate your feelings, ask to have a little talk. Express yourself in non-judgmental ways and how whatever occurred made you feel. Wait for his response. Try not to get defensive. It rarely helps. Discuss ways you might be able to handle a similar situation in the future. Remember to listen to his side too. To minimize uncomfortable situations and unhappy moments you'll both have to work on yourselves and remember what you each need in the relationship. The more you make his emotional needs a priority, the more likely he'll respond in kind.

Will this be a one time occurrence? Probably not. But with practice, you'll learn to control your emotions better and to communicate more effectively. Hopefully, it will also make each of you more aware of where your weaknesses lie. And once you're aware, you'll be able to work on it and bring your relationship to a whole new level of happiness.

Photo by Sasha Wedding Photography at http://www.sashaweddingphotography.com or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/sashaphotography and Twitter @sashaphoto

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

Thursday Action Step

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Posted on July 24, 2014 .

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

Wedding Wednesday Weekly Roundup

With visits to three beautiful botanical gardens in the past week, it only seems proper to have a roundup on flowers for the big day. There are so many fabulous choices when it comes to flowers. Here are 5 articles to help you make your wedding day decision.

Seasonal Flower Guide for Summer via Green Wedding Shoes

Wedding Flower Trends for 2014 via The Knot

Lookbook: Wedding Bouquet via Wedding Magazine

The Dos and Don'ts of Wedding Flowers via Brides

21 Absolutely Pretty Peony Wedding Bouquets via Brides

Photo by Leah Moyers Photography at www.leahmoyers.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/leahmoyersphotography and Twitter @LeahMoyersPhoto

 

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.