Choose the Perfect Venue for Your Wedding

Today, Stephanie from Canadian event planning website, EventSource, shares her insight on choosing your perfect wedding venue. Some great tips here if you're still looking around!

Congratulations, you're getting married! Now is the perfect time to start making plans. You never want to wait until the last minute. You'll soon realize that one of the most important aspects of planning the big event is choosing the perfect wedding venue.

Unfortunately, this task is typically not as easy as you might think. Why? There are a great many available options to choose from. The following information is meant to help you decide where to have your wedding. Once the decision is made, the rest of the planning process is much easier.

Choosing a Setting

The first step is to decide on a setting for the wedding. The location, atmosphere, and theme are big parts of the event. Knowing what sort of venue to look for, in the first place, makes it much easier to find suitable places.

Information for halls, churches, ballrooms, parks and all kinds of creative venues can be found on the Internet. If you’re planning on a church wedding be sure to look in to reception halls near the church. Find several that seem to fit with the theme and make a list, including contact information and notes on your first impression. That way, you can visit more than one and find a location that’s a perfect fit. Be sure to schedule a walk-through so that you can see the venue in person before making your decision.

Determining Spatial Needs

Are you having a large wedding with many people? Maybe you prefer a small gathering. It is important to keep in mind how many guests will be attending, when looking for a venue. Most venues have helpful information about their building capacity. Setting out tables and chairs to get an idea of what it will look like and to see how comfortably seated your guests will be is recommended.

The staff that you’ll be interacting with when choosing a venue are very accommodating and they want your experience to be the best, so don’t be shy about asking questions. If you’re feeling uneasy, having a little more space than what is needed might be the route you want to take in case of last minute changes.   

Visiting Venues

Before visiting the venues on your list, make a checklist of questions to ask at each one. No question is too big or small. These are a few examples:

  • Does the venue offer wedding packages?
  • Does the rental fee cover tables and chairs?
  • Is catering provided?
  • Will there be a coordinator or a crew to set-up?

Keeping this checklist with you as you visit each venue will make sure that you know everything you need to know about each one. If you take notes on each of these questions during your visit, it can help to compare them afterward.

The visit is also your chance to make sure the style of the venue suits you. Changing the whole interior style could be costly and time-consuming. If the style already matches the wedding decorations and attire, a few simple changes could lead to perfection. Also, be sure to check the venue’s policy on decorations, especially in the case of a traditional church wedding.

During your visit, be sure to look into any other aspects of the venue that will affect your decision. Make sure that there is enough parking, and that the accessibility needs of all of your guests can be met. If the wedding is planned for an outdoor area, ask about what will happen in case of bad weather.

Make sure that the venue’s tables, chairs, glassware and cutlery are to your liking. Check into the venue’s policy about noise, especially if you plan on live music or a DJ at the reception. There will be a lot to cover, but having your checklist with you will help you explore your options while having a good time.  

Narrowing Things Down

Take it easy and don’t overwhelm yourself. This is a special day and stress can affect the outcome. A pros and cons list of each venue will help you to choose the best venue that suits your needs. It is important that you are happy with every aspect of your venue.

  • Is it affordable and within your budget?
  • Is the location convenient for you and your guests?
  • Is it what you envisioned your wedding to look like?
  • Is there enough seating and space for you and your guests to feel comfortable?  

These are all questions you should ask yourself and your partner and be absolutely certain of before you make your final decision.

Remember, there's absolutely no reason to panic when choosing the perfect venue for your wedding. The most important thing is to take the time to actually enjoy the task at hand. Don't rush. Rushing only causes stress. Before you know it, all plans will be in place and you can look forward to the spectacular event.

Stephanie has spent years expanding her knowledge and passion in the photography, event and wedding industry. She now works for EventSource, a Canadian website that caters to all of your event planning needs. For more information connect with Eventsource on Facebook , Twitter , and Pinterest 

Photo by Sasha Wedding Photography at http://www.sashaweddingphotography.com or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/sashaphotography and Twitter @sashaphoto

 

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

Wedding Planning Tip of the Day

Posted on January 29, 2015 .

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

You May Want to Reconsider Your Wedding Vendors If...

Having a good working relationship with your wedding vendors is crucial not only for the success of your wedding day experience, but also for your emotional well-being. Choosing the right people to work with isn't always easy. Popularity and positive reviews are one thing, but if you don't click, you don't click. How do you know? It may come down to different things for different people, but if your potential wedding vendors do any of the following, you may want to reconsider:

Have Their Own Ideas- This is your wedding and you want to make sure your voice is heard. It's one thing for a vendor to make a suggestion or let you know the advantages and disadvantages of a wedding day decision, but ultimately you want to create your wedding day vision. If they have their own agenda and don't seem to hear what you're wanting, you're not on the same page. Start looking for a professional who values your dreams and will help you make them a reality.

Make You Feel Bad- Everybody has a different style of communication. Some people are soft spoken, others are more aggressive. Some use humor and others sarcasm. How you respond to different communication styles is an important factor that will help you determine if you want to work with someone or not. Body language counts too. Folded arms, communication tone, and even a comment like, "You seriously want that at your wedding" can make you feel bad or start second guessing yourself. If at any point during your talks, you start to have a bad feeling in the pit of your stomach, cut ties and find someone else to work with.

Do All the Talking- Sure. They're the experts. But that doesn't mean you can't get a word in edge wise. You want to work with wedding professionals who are good listeners. It means they are trying to understand your needs and wants for the big day. Talking too much can be a sign of nervousness or inadequacy and rambling on is their way of trying to impress you. But be careful. Some people simply like to talk and are very social. If there's a lot of talking going on, but you feel like you're being heard, you're probably okay. If not, you may want to interview some alternative people. 

Photo by Glessner Photography at  www.ebglessner.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/glessnerphotos and Twitter @EricGlessner

 

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

Monday Motivation

Posted on January 26, 2015 .

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.

Why It's Important to Have a Pre and Post Wedding Rainy Day Fund

Money is one of the biggest stressors when it comes to planning a wedding. It's also a major issue after marriage. That said, you'll want to make certain that you and your partner have a rainy day fund set in place. It's a good idea to begin saving even before you're married (hey, things can happen at any point in life). But if you've already tied the knot, sit down and discuss how to fund your rainy day account.

Why is it so important? You might think stashing cash in a rainy day account isn't important, but it's a necessary component to your financial freedom and peace of mind. Life happens. Think car repairs, loss of employment, moving expenses, or medical bills. These things happen. Having a financial cushion to fall back on is one little way to help reduce your stress. Most financial experts suggest having at least six months of living expenses in your rainy day account. This is particularly important if you are leaving your job and will be looking for a new source of income after you get married.

Now, you've saved money for your wedding, isn't that enough? No, that's money you've allotted to your wedding planning needs. You must have a separate account and it must be accessible. Your rainy day account is not your retirement fund, CDs, or your checking account. If you and your spouse are just starting out, figure out ways to save in a separate account. You can collect all your spare change and deposit it at the end of the week. Tax returns, monetary gifts, or bonuses from work are other good ways to fund your account. Some banks and debit cards will automatically round up amounts you spend and deposit it into an account. There are lots of creative ways to save some extra money. The hard part is not spending it. 

Save yourself financial stress now and in the future by getting a jump on your rainy day account. Do what you can, even if it's a small amount initially. Be disciplined, have a routine, or make it automatic. This is a great way to start your marriage off on the right financial footing.

Photo by Leah Moyers Photography at http://www.leahmoyers.com or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/leahmoyersphotography and Twitter @LeahMoyersPhoto

Bridal Balance is an advice and motivational blog aimed at helping the bride-to-be reduce stress, build confidence and enjoy her engagement. It was founded by clinical social worker and certified professional life coach, Michal Caplan. Contact Bridal Balance to learn more about private coaching or for additional information.

Disclaimer: The information, advice, comments, and resources provided on this site are for general informational purposes only. It is not intended as therapeutic, legal, financial, or other personal advice. While all the information is written with good intention, personal situations vary and individuals are encouraged to seek out professional advice for specific situations. This site or the advice written within does not constitute therapy or counseling and will not be held liable for any financial, legal, personal or other losses occurred.